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August is Agent Orange Awareness month, and as such, I’d like to share a few images from my ongoing project “I Am Now: Dioxin’s Legacy in Vietnam” over the next few weeks

While most associate the now infamous term with the war in Vietnam that ended over 40 years ago, few probably realize that the lasting effects of the chemical still continue today. Being deeply entrenched in the soil and water in parts of Vietnam, Dioxin makes its way into pregnant mothers and their children, both far removed from any fighting. Many have been born in the previous decades in with physical and mental birth defects, and in fact, children bearing the burdens of this horrible substance still continue to be born today.

In this image, Na, 7, a resident of Peace Village, a small hospital ward in Ho Chi Minh City that cares for Dioxin affected children, plays with her reflection on the wall. She’s always a happy girl, active if not a bit naughty at times. She’s one of the luckier ones, without major physical effects, and with the ability to move around and be somewhat independent. My wife and I visit the children here nearly every week, and love every minute we spend with them.

With these images and during this month, please take a second to reflect on what this manmade chemical has done, and let’s make sure such a catastrophe is never allowed to transpire again. Image by @quinnryanmattingly

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Quinn Ryan Mattingly
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I Am Now: Dioxin's Legacy in Vietnam, Portfolio, Photojournalism
August is Agent Orange Awareness month, and as such, I’d like to share a few images from my ongoing project “I Am Now: Dioxin’s Legacy in Vietnam” over the next few weeks<br />
<br />
While most associate the now infamous term with the war in Vietnam that ended over 40 years ago, few probably realize that the lasting effects of the chemical still continue today. Being deeply entrenched in the soil and water in parts of Vietnam, Dioxin makes its way into pregnant mothers and their children, both far removed from any fighting. Many have been born in the previous decades in with physical and mental birth defects, and in fact, children bearing the burdens of this horrible substance still continue to be born today. <br />
<br />
In this image, Na, 7, a resident of Peace Village, a small hospital ward in Ho Chi Minh City that cares for Dioxin affected children, plays with her reflection on the wall. She’s always a happy girl, active if not a bit naughty at times. She’s one of the luckier ones, without major physical effects, and with the ability to move around and be somewhat independent. My wife and I visit the children here nearly every week, and love every minute we spend with them. <br />
<br />
With these images and during this month, please take a second to reflect on what this manmade chemical has done, and let’s make sure such a catastrophe is never allowed to transpire again. Image by @quinnryanmattingly